I would just like to edit my conclusions.

Please refer to the comments by Torbin:

http://www.physi.uni-heidelberg.de/~petracek/glyphs/crabwood.jpg


The Crabwood disc says:

"Beware the bearers of FALSE gifts & their BROKEN PROMISES.Much PAIN but still time.EELIE1366E.There is GOOD out there.We oPpose DECEPTION.COnduit CLOSING,"

So, the title of my blog is wrong and perhaps also much of my conclusions. Maybe readers will still find some of the information useful on their search.
A Crop glyph formation at Crabwood with an Alien face holding CD with ASCI code message reads:
"Beware the bearers of FALSE gifts & their BROKEN PROMISES.
Much PAIN but still time.
EELrijue.
There is GOOD out there.
We OPpose DECEPTION.
COnduit CLOSING [bell sound]"

The word 'EELrijue' was not a 'mistake' that some have interpreted to be the word 'believe', but it has the intentional meaning of:
'Editable, Executable Library of a multitude' and it is referring to the infinitely evolving Collective Consciousness. The fact that this word was 'corrupted' in the crop formation seems to me to be indicating that for humanity, our Collective Consciousness is 'corrupted' or possibly even 'tampered with'. The 'false gifts and broken promises' bearers are the ETs depicted in the glyph, who are commonly referred to as the 'greys' who made agreements with the United States government for genetic experimentation in exchange for technological 'gifts'. The messengers want us to know that they are the benevolent messengers who also sent the 'Aricebo Reply' crop glyph along with the humanoid face.

Other topics include UFOs, ascension, and spirituality.

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Friday, July 18, 2008

Philadelphia

After Phil posted a message regarding time travel on the post about the sun disk, I did a little research about time travel.

Interestingly, a lot of "Phils" are associated with time travel:

Phil of the Future

Phil and Ted's Excellent adventure

The Philadelphia Experiment (google this to find out more info)

I looked up "ancient Philadelphia" and there are three cities that were formerly named Philadelphia in ancient times:

The most interesting one to me was Amman, i looked it up on Wikipedia and found interesting info relating it to:

Twin Towers
World Trade Center (33 floors)
Pillars of Hercules
Seven Hills (like Rome)
Baptism site of Jesus

From Wikipedia:

Philadelphia (Greek: Φιλαδέλφεια, /fi.la.ˈðɛl.fja/, "brotherly love") also refers to the following places:

See also List of traditional Greek place names.

Throughout history, Amman has been inhabited by several civilizations. The first civilization on record is during the Neolithic period, around 8500 BC, when archaeological discoveries in 'Ain Ghazal, located in eastern Amman, showed evidence of not only a settled life but also the growth of artistic work, which suggests that a well-developed civilization inhabited the city at that time. In the 13th century BC Amman was called Rabbath Ammon or Rabat Amon by the Ammonites (רַבַּת עַמּוֹן, Standard Hebrew Rabbat ʿAmmon, Tiberian Hebrew Rabbaṯ ʿAmmôn). It was later conquered by the Assyrians, followed by the Persians, and then the Greeks. Ptolemy II Philadelphus, the Hellenic ruler of Egypt, renamed it Philadelphia. The city became part of the Nabataean kingdom until 106 AD when Philadelphia came under Roman control and joined the Decapolis.

In 326 AD, Christianity became the religion of the empire and Philadelphia became the seat of a bishopric during the beginning of the Byzantine era. One of the churches of this period can be seen on the city's Citadel.

Philadelphia was renamed Amman during the Ghassanian era, and flourished under the Caliphates (with nearby capital) of the Umayyads (in Damascus) and the Abbasids (in Baghdad). It was then destroyed by several earthquakes and natural disasters and remained a small village and a pile of ruins until the Circassians settlement in 1887. The tide changed when the Ottoman Sultan decided to build the Hejaz railway, linking Damascus and Medina, facilitating both the annual hajj pilgrimage and permanent trade, putting Amman, a major station, back on the commercial map.

In 1921, Abdullah I chose Amman as seat of government for his newly-created state, the Emirate of Transjordan, and later as the capital of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. As there was no palatial building, he started his reign from the station, with his office in a train car. Amman remained a small city until 1948, when the population expanded considerably due to an influx of Palestinian refugees from what is now Israel. Amman has experienced exceptionally rapid development since 1952 under the leadership of two Hashemite Kings, Hussein of Jordan and Abdullah II of Jordan.

In 1970, Amman was the site of major clashes between the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and the Jordanian army. Everything around the Royal Palace sustained heavy damage from shelling. Most of Amman suffered great damage from PLO rockets and the Jordanian army's shells.

Sky line in Amman
Sky line in Amman


The city's population continues to expand at a dizzying pace (fueled by refugees escaping the wartime events in the occupied territories and Iraq). The city received refugees from these countries on a number of occasions. The first wave of Palestinian refugees arrived from what is now Israel in 1948. A second wave after the Six-Day War in 1967. A third wave of Palestinian and Jordanian and Southeast Asians, working as domestic workers, refugees arrived in Amman from Kuwait after the Gulf War of 1991. The first wave of Iraqi refugees settled in the city after the first Gulf War, with a second wave also arriving after the 2003 invasion of Iraq. During the last 10 years the amount of new buildings within the city has increased dramatically with new districts of the city being founded at a very rapid pace (particularly so in West Amman), straining the very scarce water supplies of Jordan as a whole, and exposing Amman to the hazards of rapid expansion in the absence of careful municipal planning.


On November 9, 2005, coordinated explosions rocked three hotels in Amman, shocking and angering the population of the peaceful city. The Islamist organization, al-Qaeda, claimed responsibility. Despite the fact that the birthplace of since-killed terrorist leader, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, is the town of Zarqa, less than 30 km (19 mi) from Amman. The sheer brutality of the attacks — they targeted, among other things, a Muslim wedding procession — caused widespread revulsion across the widest range of Jordanians.

[edit] Geography

Amman seen from SPOT satellite
Amman seen from SPOT satellite

Amman is located in a hilly area of north-western Jordan. The city was originally built on seven hills, but it now spans over an area of nineteen hills (each known as a jabal or "mountain"). The main areas of Amman gain their names from the hills and mountains on whose slopes they lie.

  • The Jordan Twin Towers, which are to be constructed by the Nuqul Group, and will be 34 stories high. Expected to be complete by 2008.
  • A proposed Amman World Trade Center, which will consist of 33 floors.

Amman is home to many diverse religious sects making up the two primary religions of Jordan, Islam and Christianity. Numerous mosques and churches dot the capital. The most famous mosque of Amman is the King Abduallah I Mosque which can house almost 3,000 people. Most of the people in Jordan are Muslims, 90% and 10% Christians.

The King Hussein Mosque
The King Hussein Mosque

The Citadel hill of Amman, known as Jabal el Qala, has been inhabited for centuries, important as a military and religious site. It dates back to Roman and Byzantine times, and later work was carried out in the early Islamic era. Remains unearthed at the northern and eastern ends of the Citadel, possibly date back to the Bronze Age. The Citadel also is home to the Temple of Hercules which is said to have been constructed under the Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius who reigned from 161-180 AD, is similar to the Temple of Artemis in Ephesus.

Since Amman resembles Rome, as it is situated on seven hills, the city was a favorite place for Roman soldiers and officials. Behind the Roman forum stands a Roman theatre—the largest theatre in Jordan—with room for 6,000 spectators. Thought to have been built between 138 and 161 AD by the Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius, it is constructed into the side of the mountain and is still used for sports displays and cultural events.

Amman is also home to some of the grandest mosques in the Middle East, although they compare less favorably to the ones to be found in Istanbul, Turkey. The newest of these is the enormous King Abdullah I Mosque, built between 1982 and 1989. It is capped by a magnificent blue mosaic dome beneath which 3,000 Muslims may offer prayer. The most unusual mosque in Amman is the Abu Darweesh Mosque atop Jabal Ashrafieh (the highest point in the city). It is covered with an extraordinary black and white checkered pattern and is unique to Jordan. It is striking and visible from quite some distance. In contrast, the interior is totally free of the black and white scheme. Instead, there are light colored walls and Persian carpets. This religious building was erected by one of Amman's Circassian immigrants.

Nearby places of interest

Amman is conveniently located for many Jordanian attractions favoured by tourists. It is a mere 45 minute trip by car to several interesting locations:

  • The Baptism Site (Al-Maghtas in Arabic) on the Jordan River where Jesus is believed to have been baptized by John the Baptist
  • Mount Nebo where, according to the Bible, Moses is supposed to have died
  • The unique ultra saline waters of the Dead Sea, home to many first-rate resorts
  • Jerash, a city of the Decapolis and considered one of the most important and best preserved Roman cities in the Near East
  • The Hellenistic ruin of Qasr al Abd, in the near-by valley of Wadi Al Seer
  • Petra, two hours from Aqaba, is one of the most breathtaking places in the world (one of the 7 wonders of the world)
  • The beaches at Aqaba, a shipping port and Jordan's only access to the Red Sea. Just about three of four hours from Amman by car or 350 km (220 mi) away. You can also take a plane on Royal Jordanian from Queen Alia Airport to King Hussein International Airport (Aqaba Airport). The primarily industrial character of the town is mitigated by the fact that it is set between sprawling mountain ranges and boasts some of the finest coral reefs in the region.
  • The unique geological rock formations of Wadi Rum. The colorful rocks are best viewed at sunset and located a half hour away from Petra. Wadi Rum has connections with T. E. Lawrence; consequently the movie Lawrence of Arabia filmed there for a number of scenes.

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